Archive for the ‘Covenantal Language’ Category

Zechariah 14

By GARY DEMAR | Published: DECEMBER 28, 2006

Zechariah 14

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

Then the LORD will go forth and fight against those nations, as when He fights on a day of battle (14:3).

After using Rome as His rod to smite Jerusalem, God later turns on Rome in judgment. Once again, Assyria is the model: “I send it against a godless nation and commission it against the people of My fury to capture booty and to seize plunder, and to trample them down like mud in the streets . . . . So it will be that when the Lord has completed all His work on Mount Zion and on Jerusalem, He will say, ‘I will punish the fruit of the arrogant heart of the king of Assyria and the pomp of his haughtiness’” (Isa. 10:5–6, 12–13). The fall of Assyria did not immediately follow its plunder of Israel. The same is true of God’s use of Rome to judge Israel. Read the rest of this entry »

Zechariah 14

By GARY DEMAR | Published: DECEMBER 27, 2006

Zechariah 14

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

“For I will gather all the nations against Jerusalem to battle, and the city will be captured, the houses plundered, the women ravished and half of the city exiled, but the rest of the people will not be cut off from the city” (Zech. 14:2).

Six thousand Jews were murdered by Alexander Janneus (103–76 B.C.) during the Feast of Tabernacles in the early part of the first century B.C. Here’s how Josephus describes the event: Read the rest of this entry »

Zechariah 14

By GARY DEMAR | Published: DECEMBER 26, 2006

Zechariah 14

Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

Zechariah 14 opens with the promise that “a day is coming for the LORD when the spoil taken from you will be divided among you” (Zech. 14:1). No time is specified for when this event will take place. Should we look to our future for fulfillment or are there more proximate events that best fit the historical and theological context of Zechariah’s day? We know that four kingdoms would subjugate Israel during and after her exile (Dan. 2–3): Babylon, the Medes and Persians, the Greeks, and the Romans. In Zechariah 14:2, we learn that God will gather “all the nations against Jerusalem to battle” (see Part 2), with the result that the city would be “captured, the houses plundered, the women ravished, and half the city exiled” (Zech. 14:2). While dispensationalists apply this verse to a post-rapture great tribulation, and amillennialists apply it to the persecution of the church down through the ages, I contend that the passage refers to the domination of Israel by the Romans and Herodians in the period leading up to the Incarnation and ministry of Jesus. The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia describes the period this way: Read the rest of this entry »

…in all the world

The kingdom shall be preached in all the world

Jesus said, “this gospel of the kingdom shall be preached in all the world for a witness unto all nations; and then shall the end come” (Matthew. 24:14, KJV). In “Go ye into all the world, and preach the gospel to every creature”(Mark 16:15, KJV). The year is 33 A.D.

Paul his missionary journeys completed, writes from his imprisonment in Rome to the saints in Colosse…the gospel which you heard, which was preached to every creature under heaven, of which I, Paul, became a minister. (Colossians 1:23) …The year is 64 A.D. Read the rest of this entry »

If Christ has not come, then we are still waiting to be where he is. (John 14:3)

If Christ has not come, then we are still waiting for the plan of redemption to be fulfilled (Rev. 10:7)

If Christ has not come, then we are still waiting to be individually redeemed from our sins. (Luke 21:28)

If Christ has not come, then we are still in the “last days,” 1900 years later. (Heb. 1:2)

If Christ has not come, not one jot or tittle has passed from the Law. (Matt. 5:17-18)

If Christ has not come, then some Christians are getting quite aged. (Matt 16:28; I Thess 5:23; I Cor 15:51)

If Christ has not come, then the charismata (tongues, prophecy, etc.) are still in effect. (I Cor. 13:10)

If Christ has not come, then we still await the day when Christ will finally accomplish that which He said he would do over 1900 years ago, when it was declared He “would not tarry.” (yet we hear many preachers today say, “We will meet again next week, if the Lord tarries,” as if it is a given that the Lord has tarried all this time).

If Christ has not come, then the dead are still waiting to enter into heaven, and, to this day, “sleep” in their graves, waiting to enter into his rest. (I Cor. 15:20-23)

If Christ has not come, then the Old Covenant is still waiting to vanish away. (Heb. 8:13)

If Christ has not come, then we can still lose out on salvation after having been partakers of the holy Ghost. (Heb. 6:4-6)

If we say that Christ has not come, then we make Christ a liar. (Rev. 21:20)

 

In this review, I will show the four reason on why some who claim to hold to the Preterist view, of eschatology, but later end up on leaving it left behind do to difficulty on grasping the covenantal message behind their questions they are seeking an answer for.

Below is one person’s four reasons for claiming their departure or frankly never coming to grips with it in the first place…in more simpler words they might of never help the Preterist position to begin with.

What is a Preterist?: Read the rest of this entry »

Don K. Preston

One of the most common objections lodged against Covenant Eschatology is this: “Since Peter’s statement ‘a day with the Lord is as a thousand years’ is in reference to the timing of Christ’s return, we should not expect Second Coming time statements such as ‘near, at hand,’ or ‘shortly’ to be interpreted by man’s understanding, but by God’s. Thus, from His perspective, only two days have passed since the NT claimed that the return of Christ was ‘at hand.’” Read the rest of this entry »

By Don K. Preston

With the turn of the century approaching speculation about the “end of the world” is running rampant. But does the Bible actually predict an end of time? Does the Biblical term “the last days” refer to the last days of TIME or to the last days of an AGE? We wish to take note some Bible facts. Read the rest of this entry »

In Part one of “From The Old To The New” we left off looking at the seen and the unseen.

2 Cor 4:17-18 “For our light affliction, which is but for a moment, worketh for us a far more exceeding and eternal weight of glory; While we look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen: for the things which are seen are temporal; but the things which are not seen are eternal.” Read the rest of this entry »

To break a paradigm you must be willing to look at something from a different, maybe not so obvious, new perspective. In my bible study I try to do this as often as I can. I have found that a great deal of what I have heard from the pulpit in the last 30 years of listening to preachers has been a party line or a denominational position.

In trying to live a berean life and wanting to be able to hear God’s spirit for myself, I have had to throw off much of the “Christian Party Line” and the denominational dogma.

Another passage that has confronted me lately in my paradigm shift is 2 Corinthians. After an extended introduction in chapters 1 and 2 Paul begins in Chapter 3 to highlight the superiority of the New Covenant over the Old Covenant. Read the rest of this entry »