Archive for January, 2011

A Commentary On the Apocalypse, Volume 1

A Commentary On the Apocalypse, Volume 2

This is an EXACT reproduction of a book published before 1923. This IS NOT an OCR’d book with strange characters, introduced typographical errors, and jumbled words. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

Misplaced Hope: The Origins of First and Second Century Eschatology

Historically the Christian faith has believed that Jesus will return again one day, visibly in the sky. However, several centuries of Bible scholarship have been pointing out glaring problems with this premise.

Casting caution aside, entire millennial movements have been founded, and dates keep being set. Could the confessing church be wrong? Could it have misread its fulfilled roots?

How did the early church understand its eschatology after the fall of Jerusalem? Misplaced Hope takes you back to the apostolic fathers and the first two centuries of church history (A.D. 70 – 200) to find the answers.

House Divided: Bridging the Gap in Reformed Eschatology – A Preterist Response to When Shall These Things Be?

This book is a Reformed response to Keith Mathison’s multi-authored book When Shall These Things Be? which was a critique and condemnation of “hyper-preterism.” Samuel Frost, David Green, Edward Hassertt and Michael Sullivan demonstrate that the advent of full preterism in church history is the result of “organic development” from within the historic, Reformed church, and that it represents the uniting of the divided house of Reformed eschatology. As the authors navigate through the confusing maze of the Mathison volume, they overturn the arguments that the authors of that book levied against the truth that Jesus Himself taught in no uncertain terms.

We Shall Meet Him In The Air, The Wedding of the King of kings (Volume 1)

An In depth analysis of 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18. THis book is the first and only full preterist exegesis of this text. This book interacts with the world’s best scholarship– including N. T. Wright, Scott McKnight, France, Nanos, Pitre, etc. to establish the first century fulfillment. Along the way, Preston demonstrates the fallacy of the Left Behind theology, and responds to the leading critics of the preterist movement.

An In depth analysis of 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18. THis book is the first and only full preterist exegesis of this text. This book interacts with the world’s best scholarship– including N. T. Wright, Scott McKnight, France, Nanos, Pitre, etc. to establish the first century fulfillment. Along the way, Preston demonstrates the fallacy of the Left Behind theology, and responds to the leading critics of the preterist movement.

The Heritage Guide to the Constitution

This guide is the first of its kind, and presents the U.S. Constitution as never before, including a clause-by-clause analysis of the document, each amendment and relevant court case, and the documents that serve as the foundation of the Constitution.

By, Edwin Meese

“The Constitution,” pledged George Washington,
“is the guide which I will never abandon.” Can we say the same today?

Spiritual men, in their distresses, turn at once to prayer, even as the stag when hunted takes to flight. Prayer is a never-failing resort; it is sure to bring a blessing with it. Even apart from the answer of our supplications, the very exercise of prayer is healthy to the man engaged in it. Far be it from me ever to say a word in disparagement of the holy, happy, heavenly exercise of prayer. But, beloved, there are times when prayer is not enough-when prayer itself is out of season. You will think that a hard saying, and say, “Who can hear it?…”

Moses prayed that God would deliver his people; but the Lord said to him, “Wherefore criest thou unto me?” As much as to say this is not the time for prayer, it is the time for action. “Speak unto the children of Israel, that they go forward.” When we have prayed over a matter to a certain degree, it then becomes sinful to tarry any longer; our plain duty is to carry our desires into action, and having asked God’s guidance, and having received divine power from on high, to go at once to our duty without any longer deliberation or delay.

From a sermon entitled “Forward! Forward! Forward!,” delivered October 18, 1863

Easy, common-sense solutions that eliminate the mess, free up our time, and restore “Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness”

By Robert John Stevens, CEO of WriteExpress Corporation

This article will expand as new ideas come.

  1. Abolish all taxes except sales tax. Make it simple: You buy, you pay. Benefits: No more IRS, no more months wasted preparing annual taxes, no more mountains of government red tape. Nations have rebelled over far less taxation or fewer days of slavery, including thirteen American colonies.
  2. Forgive all debt—both nationally and individually. Time to start over folks. Under Biblical law, the release of debts came at the end of seven years: Read the rest of this entry »